Eric Coates

Musically this record has a certain Home Service charm (Coates composed the theme to the Dam Busters and ‘By a Sleepy Lagoon’ which became the music for Desert Island Discs). It is also steeped in the melancholy of a world lost in time. This LP from, I think, 1950 has a wonderful sleeve though…designer and illustrator unknown. Anyone out there got any ideas?

coates2

 

 

 

Missed/Remembered/Mis-remembered

I have been thinking about this entry for months…at least since visiting Taiwan in 2013. I have been putting it off for two reasons…

  1. It deals with religion…particularly Buddhism. I know next to nothing about Buddhism.
  2. It is also ‘about’ my friend Tom who died some years ago. This blog doesn’t quite seem like the place to talk about him…the blog doesn’t usually stray into personal territory. Tom was a Buddhist and he knew I was sceptical and an atheist. I didn’t want to write something about him that was slight. Maybe what follows doesn’t add up to much but now I think it is better to write something than say nothing.

I was going to start with a postcard that I bought in Dens Road Market in Dundee in the mid-1970s. Tom might have been with me at the time, I don’t know. My memory of the postcard was that it was in black and white and showed a group of traveling musicians in Nepal or Tibet. I have just found the postcard after a long search and this memory is only partially accurate. It is in black and white, there are two musicians, two acrobats and a large family group with horses in the background…so they are probably nomadic performers. But the location of the picture is ‘Kirgisen’ which is now Kyrgyzstan. The people in the picture are probably Muslims and not Buddhists. So this opening paragraph, instead of making a direct link to Tom, opens up questions of memory.

I didn’t see Tom between him telling me he had cancer and his death. He thought there was more time than there turned out to be – I wanted to believe him and did. The last time I saw him he left me this card:

card002

‘Nam-myho-renge-kyo’ is a phrase to be chanted. ‘Kyo’ is ‘the sound or vibration that connects everything to the universe’. At Tom’s funeral outside Glasgow there were beautiful unaccompanied Buddhist chants sung by his friends from the temple of which he was a member…suddenly it seemed to me that I had underestimated his beliefs. I regretted not seeing him before he died. I was sad that we often did not see eye-to-eye though I also knew that our friendship had been robust and we never fell out. We grew up quite close to one another before we met and there were, I think, many complicated bonds between us…bonds of difference and bonds of similarity. If Tom had been asked to depict the chanting he might have drawn this:

circle001

 

 

 

 

I might draw this:

circle002

 

 

 

 

 

In Taiwan, I found myself in a culture where Buddhism and its manifestations were never far away…even though it was probably not the kind that Tom adhered to. One afternoon, as part of the work I was doing there, I visited the University Hospital and there were street stalls selling little ‘Buddha boxes’.


IMG_5047

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our guide advised me against buying one of these because she said that they were just for people who were dying. I didn’t believe this (it turned out I was correct…they were being sold at the hospital to give comfort, not to accompany the dying into the next world).

Then that evening we went to one of Taipei’s oldest temples. Compared to any Christian church this place was really lively but there was no music (I am not entirely sure of this…maybe there were prayers).  I picked up one of the free cassettes:

IMG_5046


 

 

 

Then we walked around the Night Market…if the temple had been an intensive visual and olfactory overload, this was multiplied in the market and had an added layer of cacophonous sound. At a corner near the temple I stopped and recorded a woman sitting on a bicycle chanting the name of Buddha.

taipei


Compared to the sound at Tom’s funeral, the cassette tape and even the little Buddha box, this chant is harsh and discordant and it is the flip side of the calm that these other sounds generate.

I think about Tom most days.

Silent Dalston revisited (2008-2014)

Kingsland Road

Kingsland Road

In January 2008 I put together an album of photographs and posted them on that very well known social network. Thinking about this group of pictures lead eventually to this blog…an edited version of one of them provided my ‘profile’ picture. Passing that particular site recently I noticed that the sign had gone and the shopfront had been stripped back. This prompted me to revisit the photographs and their sites. Some things have changed round here since 2008 and, luckily, others have not. Here is the first part of the two parallel albums.

King Henry's Walk

King Henry’s Walk

Shacklewell Lane. 2008. 2008, 2014

Shacklewell Lane. 2008. 2008, 2014

Kingsland Road

Kingsland Road

Ridley Road Market

Ridley Road Market

Ridley Road Market

Ridley Road Market

Ridley Road Market

Ridley Road Market

Balls Pond Road

Balls Pond Road

B, B & C @ Vortex

bb&c001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are 3 drawings from the Berne, Black and Cline gig at Vortex Jazz on Friday 14th January. The first one is the whole band and done in my usual way…the other two (of Tim Berne and Nels Cline respectively) are oil transfers from drawings done on the night. This is what happens when you spend a Monday afternoon at Tate Modern’s Paul Klee exhibition…shameless plagiarism…berne002

 

cline003

 

Resonance at Oto

 

 

 

Rie Nakajima

Rie Nakajima

Resonance Radio 104.4 Fundraiser at Cafe Oto, 13th February 2014.

Rie Nakajima has a particular take on performance. For the second time on seeing her at Cafe Oto she set up her table of paraphernalia at the back of the space. So most of the audience need to turn 180 degrees and readjust their viewing positions. For the first part of her set she sits on the floor in front of the low wicker table thoughtfully activating the various battery driven gadgets that are her instruments. The process is gradual – she takes her time before setting the mechanics in motion. It almost looks like she has never done this before and is working out the logistics of it as she goes along. And in some ways I guess she is doing just that. About half way through she gets herself a seat but even then she is crouching over the table. It is as if she is buried in the work at hand – buried not just in the sound but also in the actions that produce the sound. Unlike many performances the audience are drawn into this position too – searching along with her for the next move, the next noise as if it was a process of archaeology. We are all looking down watching the small spectacle of movement, sound, action, repetition. This all demands a certain commitment of attention from the audience….and this is what Nakajima, her performance, her music, requires. This is an exercise in close, communal listening.

http://www.rienakajima.com

Yuri Suzuki reinvents the DJ.

Yuri Suzuki reinvents the DJ.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Janek Schaefer

Janek Schaefer

 

 

 

Janek Schaefer presents his half hour radio special.

Janek Schaefer presents his radio special.

 

 

 

 

Oscillatorial Binnage

Oscillatorial Binnage

Related/Unrelated

In the absence of some substantial piece of writing:

I did this drawing at Vortex Jazz on 4th February…it’s Stephan Crump of the Rosetta Trio:

crump001

…wondering how I might integrate it into a different kind of drawing, I redrew it using the same technique (looking at the subject but not the object – i.e. the drawing on which I was engaged). Then I built/drew a frame around it and it has come out like this (so far):

sc in a room

 

 

 

On Sunday as I walked home I found this CD on Kingsbury Road next to the Jewish cemetery:

plectrum:cd001 I found the plectrum on Culford Road 2 days later. Here is Track 1 of the CD…I don’t know what it is called nor who is playing.